Australian Dairy Industry Sustainability Report: How we’re tracking

Dec 08, 2014

The Australian Dairy Industry Sustainability Framework outlines the industry’s commitment to enhance livelihoods, improve wellbeing and reduce our environmental footprint.


To ensure dairy is recognised worldwide as a responsible, responsive and prosperous producer of nutritious food, the Framework sets 11 economic, social and environmental targets to be achieved by the year 2020.


The second Sustainability Framework Progress Report is due to be released in December to benchmark how the industry is tracking towards achieving these targets, including supporting case studies to back these findings.



The ADF Update had the opportunity to preview some of the report’s preliminary findings, which can be found below.

ü  14.5% reduction in volume of green house gas emissions intensity generated by dairy manufacturers’ use of fuel and electricity since 2010/11 – a 30% reduction is the target set by 2020.

ü  46% of on-farm and factory workers now have a documented occupational health and safety (OH&S) plan – by 2020, the framework aims for 100% to have completed OH&S training.

ü  56% of farmers are aware of a new set of animal welfare standards and guidelines for cattle that have been developed – whilst yet to be legislated, the industry seeks 100% compliance with the guidelines’ standards by 2020.

ü  10.5% reduction in water consumption since 2010/11 – a 20% reduction by 2020 is the target set for the manufacturing sector.

ü  44.5% reduction in waste to landfill by manufacturers since 2010/11, which has already met and exceeded the target of a 40% reduction by 2020.


Dairy Industry Sustainability Framework Steering Committee Chair, Chris Griffin said the 2014 Progress Report provides evidence the dairy industry is committed to delivering mutually beneficial outcomes for the community and the environment.


“The Report demonstrates the benefits of the value chain working together to help create value for our industry, our customers and the community,” Mr Griffin said.


“Built on existing industry activities, we hope it will provide guidance to farmers, dairy companies and industry bodies on achieving our shared priorities and commitments."


To view the 2014 Progress Report online, stay tuned to www.australiandairyfarmers.com.au over the coming week.

Tribute to Lynne Kosky

Dec 05, 2014

The Australian dairy industry sends its condolences to Lynne Kosky’s family, after she passed away on 4 December.


Ms Kosky, former Minister for Transport in the Brumby Government, will be remembered by Victorian farmers for her work on the state’s regional rail and transport plan.


Outside of her political career, after retiring from Parliament in 2010 due to illness, Ms Kosky was the inaugural Dairy Industry People Development Council (DIPDC) Chair until she stepped down earlier this year.


DIPDC Chair, John Versteden said Ms Kosky provided invaluable industry leadership in the people development advocacy area, “a bold industry initiative that had been difficult to navigate through in previous years”.


“Aside from her strong leadership skills and networks, Lynne’s genuine empathy and passion in the people development field provided the solid foundation upon which the Dairy Industry People Development Council was formed,” Mr Versteden said.


“The dairy industry has lost an extremely valuable friend and she will be sorely missed.”

Industry farewells two “top blokes”

Dec 05, 2014

The Australian dairy industry has recently farewelled two long-standing leaders; dedicated dairy farmers; husbands; fathers; and grandfathers... But most of all, two “top blokes”.


Officially stepping down from their roles as Directors on the ADF Board at the end of 2014, together  Chris Griffin and Peter Evans have served over 70 remarkable years as dairy leaders.


ADF Chair, Noel Campbell said their presence will be missed.


“Their tireless efforts and unrelenting dedication to improving and promoting our great industry over many years has not gone unnoticed,” Mr Campbell said.


With more than 35 years experience in dairying on his farm at Westbury, Gippsland, Mr Griffin has led dairy through tough times of drought and the milk price wars. He has also opened our eyes to the possibilities of the future, in new markets, new technology and innovative on-farm practices.  


Chris Griffin on his Gippsland dairy farm, Victoria


Mr Griffin, who has served as a member of the ADF Board since 2005, is the immediate past President of ADF, and former Chair of the ADIC, said the industry was full of people who care.


“People join these organisations because they are vehicles for getting things done... This is an industry in great hands and I’ll be watching with keen interest,” Mr Griffin said.


West Australian dairy farmer, Mr Evans has been active in farmers associations since 1978 and has held many notable industry positions, including having served on the ADF Board since 2007 and in the role of ADF Vice President from 2011 to 2012.

Peter Evans receiving the 2014 WA Milk Bottle Award


Most recently winner of the prestigious WA Milk Bottle Award for outstanding service to the dairy industry earlier this year, Mr Evans said he never considered himself to be a “political animal”.


“I never considered myself to be a political animal but because of poor politics in WA (at the time of industry deregulation), I found advocacy a great tool for getting things done.


“Now into my seventh year on the ADF Board, we are far from perfect but our policies are having better traction with Government than ever before,” Mr Evans said.


ADF wishes the retired Directors all the best as they look to spend more time with their families, travelling and on-farm. 

National Breeding Objective: Officially launched

Dec 03, 2014

The prosperity of the Australian dairy industry is underpinned by the profitability of the cows farmers milk. New breeding indices set an exciting path for genetic improvement in Australia.

Developed by the National Breeding Objective (NBO) Task Force and driven by the Australian Dairy Improvement Scheme (ADHIS) after an extensive consultation process with dairy farmers from across all dairying regions, the NBO aims to deliver herds that the Australian dairy industry needs for the future.

Three new breeding indices will be released from April 2015. The Balanced Performance Index (BPI) will replace the Australian Profit Ranking and aims to achieve farm profit through a balance of longevity, health, type and efficient production. Two additional indices will also be introduced to align with specific breeding philosophies, namely the Health Weighted Index (HWI) and the Type Weighted Index (TWI).

Officially launched at the Australian Dairy Industry Council (ADIC) Industry Leaders’ Breakfast, ADHIS General Manager, Daniel Abernethy said the new indices are backed by strong science and are in line with farmer trait preferences.

“For the first time, farmers and their advisors directly contributed towards the NBO’s development through initiatives including Australia’s Longest Farmwalk and a sector wide survey to ensure the indices are well suited for the future needs of farmers,” Mr Abernethy said.

In another industry first, the new breeding indices now also include feed efficiency - a new trait which has been developed through ground breaking research from the Dairy Futures CRC and the Department of Environment and Primary Industries Victoria, supported by Dairy Australia and The Geoffrey Gardiner Foundation.

For more information and to download a copy of the NBO, click here.

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