February President's Message

Feb 29, 2016

There has been a lot of discussion about investment for a stronger future this month, with a great deal of excitement generated by recent investments in Australian dairy.

Such investment will have positive impacts for farming communities.Investors may be interested in further value added opportunities for milk processing. This could be a generator of new growth and development for the whole industry. Investment that passes our foreign investment regulatory tests continue to the benefit of Australian dairy.

Importantly, our industry recognises that this stronger future depends equally on economic, environmental and social outcomes. Dairy continues to hold itself accountable by not waiting for change to occur, but by initiating positive change ourselves. The industry’s progress is highlighted by the Sustainability Framework’s 2015 Progress Report – set to be released shortly via www.sustainabledairyoz.com.au.

It was my great pleasure to discuss the industry’s performance against the key targets with the Department of Agriculture and Water Resources in late February at the Canberra Dairy Forum, and to share more about our industry’s commitment to retaining our social licence to operate.

I encourage you all to take a look at the Progress Report when it is released in mid-march and provide feedback.

Part of tackling sustainability challenges and helping the industry demonstrate performance to the Australian community, is investing in agile representative structures. On the heels of a period of significant policy achievement, ADF is in the strongest position it has ever been. Much of this we owe to our 2012 restructure which helped build greater transparency and engagement with key stakeholders, particularly decision makers in government.

We recognise that there is room to further improve our representative models, to ensure that we can continue to effectively advocate on behalf of all dairy farmers in all dairying regions. The proposed National Farmers’ Federation’s restructure has begun this conversation and ADF looks forward to furthering this discussion to ensure dairy representation has a future that maintains currency, relevance and accountability.

Simone Jolliffe

ADF President

Trans-Pacific Partnership signed

Feb 04, 2016

The official signing of the Trans Pacific Partnership (TPP) in Auckland, on 4 February has been welcomed by the Australian Dairy Industry Council (ADIC). The signing follows an agreement reached between the twelve negotiating countries on 6 October 2015.

The TPP made some gains made for the Australian dairy industry in improving opportunities in key export markets such as Japan.

The conclusion of the TPP continues a historic period of increased trade liberalisation over the past few years.

Following the signing ceremony, Australia must now go through a domestic ratification process. This means that before any binding treaty action is taken, the TPP text and a National Interest Analysis will be tabled in Parliament for 20 joint sitting days.

The Joint Standing Committee on Treaties (JSCOT) will conduct an inquiry into the TPP and report back to Parliament on 'matters arising from the TPP treaty and related National Interest Analysis and proposed treaty actions presented or deemed to be presented to the Parliament.'

The ADIC will provide a submission to the inquiry.


 

Introducing ADF's New Director's...

Jan 18, 2016

Australian Dairy Farmers (ADF) is pleased to welcome new Business Director, Terry Richardson and Independent Director, Dr Dedee Woodside, alongside recently elected President, Simone Jolliffe to the ADF Board following the ADF Annual General Meeting on 26 November 2015.

With significant experience in various agriculture roles, as well as through their diverse industry leadership and advocacy roles, both Board members are exceedingly well qualified for their Board position, each bringing a unique perspective to the table.

ADF interviewed each Director to find out a bit more about them. We asked them what they believe the most important policy issues are for ADF to focus on in 2016...

Terry Richardson

As a native New Zealander I have great appreciation for the vast geographical challenges that Australian dairy farmers face. As a dairy farmer I know that it is difficult to prepare and mitigate these challenges unless we are building sustainable business models. In order to achieve this it is essential to be profitable. For these reasons I believe the short term and long term goals of ADF are intrinsically linked.

Our policy focus will always be set by what stands in the way of building a stronger future for our industry. This will mean the continued implementation of projects that propel us toward the industry’s vision to become prosperous, trusted and world renowned for nutrition.

In order to help achieve this vision, ADF can develop its communication of the role policy plays in helping us be profitable. Price will always be on the front page, but policy is always bubbling away behind the scenes – we often don’t hear much about it. Yet without strong policies that address everything from competition issues to research and development funding, it is impossible for our industry to be profitable. For this reason I am keen to work with ADF to continue to build our members and non-members’ understanding of how important policy is to what we do.

Through key achievements such as the pro-dairy China-Australia FTA we have seen how effective our industry is when united – we must continue this unity in order to see improved policy outcomes for our industry in future.

Dr Dedee Woodside

Dairy’s central focus for 2016 appears to increasingly be on water, soils and energy – and the availability, quality and sustainability of these resources.

I am attracted to the idea that with such a buzz around environmental responsibility and impact at the moment there is a real opportunity for the Australian dairy industry to make some headway on issues of concern to our farmers, processors and consumers. In particular with the recent Paris Climate Summit and the Australian Government’s commitment to energy targets we can highlight that this isn’t an overnight process. Our industry needs strong thought and planning to ensure we are achieving our environmental targets in a way that is reasonable and practical.

Already the industry has begun on this path, particularly in light of the growing opportunity in overseas markets and talk of expanding production. I am interested to contribute to this discussion, to understand whether growth is really a viable option and to understand what the limits are; where we can be smarter about our operations and where we need to change tactics entirely.

I am excited to be a part of ADF’s journey under a new President, Simone Jolliffe and a part of an industry that is growing, changing and opening up. The next few years will be very interesting.

ADF President, Simone Jolliffe welcomed the new additions to the Board and said she looks forward to working with them in 2016.

“Their vision and ideas will help ADF in its work to promote the interests and sustainable profitability of all Australian dairy farmers,” Mrs Jolliffe said.

For more information on ADF’s Directors see www.australiandairyfarmers.com.au

Five new Ag Counsellors to help seize opportunity

Oct 12, 2015

The announcement of five new Agricultural Counsellors in overseas markets has been welcomed by the Australian Dairy Industry Council (ADIC) as a positive step toward addressing non-tariff barriers to trade.

The ADIC has been a strong advocate for increased resources toward overcoming technical barriers to trade in overseas markets and is pleased to see the Coalition Government’s acknowledgement of this issue.

A recent report commissioned by Dairy Australia, suggested that if the aggregated sum of all technical barriers to trade imposed by countries importing Australian product were reduced it could benefit global dairy trade by up to $1.57 billion. This amount includes the opportunity costs resulting from having technical barriers to trade in place as well as the potential gains from their removal.

ADIC Chair, Noel Campbell said the announcement of three new positions in Vietnam, Malaysia and the Middle East, as well as additional postings in Bangkok and China, would help the industry make the most of recent trade agreements as well as open up access to emerging markets.

“The appointment of these Counsellors will assist Australian dairy to promote its high quality, safe product in growth markets across South East Asia, the Middle East and of course China where there is growing interest in our products,” Mr Campbell said.

“It is also a further positive step toward addressing technical barriers to trade in international markets. The extent to which our industry is able to seize opportunities delivered through recently completed and pending trade agreements will depend upon addressing nontariff barriers. These Counsellors will help to improve the flow of Australian dairy products to international markets. It will also ensure that Australian dairy farmers can attain a fair price for their product.”

The ADIC continues to work with all overseas Counsellors, in conjunction with Government to promote Australian dairy overseas and ensure improved access to key export markets.

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