Trans-Pacific Partnership signed

Feb 04, 2016

The official signing of the Trans Pacific Partnership (TPP) in Auckland, on 4 February has been welcomed by the Australian Dairy Industry Council (ADIC). The signing follows an agreement reached between the twelve negotiating countries on 6 October 2015.

The TPP made some gains made for the Australian dairy industry in improving opportunities in key export markets such as Japan.

The conclusion of the TPP continues a historic period of increased trade liberalisation over the past few years.

Following the signing ceremony, Australia must now go through a domestic ratification process. This means that before any binding treaty action is taken, the TPP text and a National Interest Analysis will be tabled in Parliament for 20 joint sitting days.

The Joint Standing Committee on Treaties (JSCOT) will conduct an inquiry into the TPP and report back to Parliament on 'matters arising from the TPP treaty and related National Interest Analysis and proposed treaty actions presented or deemed to be presented to the Parliament.'

The ADIC will provide a submission to the inquiry.


 

January 2016 President's Message

Jan 25, 2016

Welcome to the New Year. I hope you have all had the chance for a short break at least, and are ready to work together to tackle the challenges and opportunities that 2016 brings.

In recent years, Australian Dairy Farmers (ADF) has strengthened dairy’s ties with Canberra to raise the profile of the issues that matter most to our farmers. ADF has maintained our reputation of acting apolitically, being accessible to all politicians, and being willing to listen.

This year we will continue to build this profile, while simultaneously building on our capacity to deliver value to members.

So far in 2016, key members of the ADF team have visited members in central New South Wales. In February our CEO will visit Western Australia – to talk and listen about priorities for the year ahead. These are the first of many 2016 interstate meetings to follow.

I encourage you to take the opportunity and introduce yourself to our team. The passion and commitment that the ADF staff has to help achieve a stronger future for our industry is evident, and we are all prepared to listen to your thoughts, ideas and constructive feedback.

The beginning of the year has been challenging for farmers. Extreme weather conditions brought drought or very dry conditions in Tasmania, West Victoria, South Australia as well as savage bushfires in Western Australia. ADF is seeking to assist its state members with recovery efforts. I commend the efforts of WA Farmers, Western Dairy and Dairy Australia, in providing practical support and counsel to the affected farmers in WA.

Events like these are a timely reminder that so many aspects of our business are affected by elements beyond our control. ADF is committed to ensure that farmers have the information and resources they need to take control of what they can. Dairy Australia also has a great resource of tools and information to assist in preparation and recovery.

In February, ADF will host an environmental scanning and industry planning workshop with key stakeholders such as our state members and Dairy Australia. These sessions will aid in setting our advocacy priorities for 2016, to establish a sound policy platform which ensures we can capitalise upon growth opportunities delivered by 2015’s advocacy.

I look forward to getting out and about in order to meet with as many members and non-members as possible over the course of 2016 to ensure ADF can continue to deliver value for the industry.

Simone Jolliffe

ADF President

Getting ChAFTA over the line requires united front

Sep 30, 2015

Getting the China-Australia Free Trade Agreement (ChAFTA) ratified will require farmers to show their communities what this opportunity means to them, according to Australian Dairy Farmers (ADF) President, Noel Campbell.

Mr Campbell, along with representatives from the United Dairyfarmers of Victoria (UDV) and the Victorian Farmers Federation (VFF), was in Northern Victoria as part of a Regional Roadshow which kicked off on Monday 21 September.

The industry used the roadshow to ask as many farmers as possible for their help in getting the China agreement ratified before the end of the 2015 calendar year.

“Farm lobby groups are leading the push to get the deal passed through Parliament.ADF, in collaboration with the State Dairy Farming Organisations has been wearing a path to Canberra, lobbying both sides of parliament and the independent senators to highlight why this deal is important,” Mr Campbell said.

“The ChAFTA is under threat. We need farmers, processors, service providers and regional communities to help us get this deal over the line before the end of the year. We need your help to explain to your neighbours, friends and family why this deal matters for Australia.”

The regional meetings were well attended, with over 100 farmers attending for the first three events in West Victoria. Farmers from all commodities – not just dairy – attended the meetings, demonstrating that the entire farming community is well aware of what is at stake.

Tatura dairy farmer, Ingrid Tysoe said the ChAFTA was about building long term sustainable profitability.

“For farm security, things are going to be a lot better; this gives courage for us to work towards the future,” Ms Tyson said.

"I felt that the session was really informative and it's giving us hope that the dairy industry is looking brighter for us.”

Mr Campbell told attendees that it was essential to highlight that the ChAFTA is a good deal not just for farmers but for the Australian community.

“We worked hard to get a true ‘free trade’ agreement with the ChAFTA last year. With tariffs down to zero over the next four to 11 years on dairy products, we believe this has been achieved,” Mr Campbell said.

“The ChAFTA is a great deal for Australian dairy and a great deal for the Australian community. If ratified this year, the dairy industry alone will see growth in job creation across the value chain. We expect that around 600-700 jobs will be created within the first year of ratification. More dairy jobs means more vibrant, prosperous and growing rural and regional communities across all of Australia's dairying regions.

“I urge all of you to get on board to help us ensure that this deal is implemented this year so that our industry, as well as the broader community can start to take advantage of the benefits this deal brings.”

With meetings in Victoria to conclude on Tuesday 29 September, ADF plans to take the regional roadshow to Tasmania to spread the word about how farmers can help get ChAFTA over the line.


Dairy remains hopeful of comprehensive TPP outcome

Aug 17, 2015

In the wake of the Maui Trans-Pacific Partnership (TPP) ministerial meetings, the Australian Dairy Industry Council (ADIC) has re-emphasised the importance of achieving a commercially meaningful outcome for all Australian dairy producers with regards to the Trans-Pacific Partnership Agreement (TPP).

While the ADIC is disappointed that a meaningful agreement has not been reached to date, it remains hopeful that in the near future a TPP which is in the best interests of the Australian dairy industry - and importantly the Australian community as a whole, will be completed.

The TPP is a multi-country Free Trade Agreement (FTA) currently under negotiation between Australia, Brunei, Chile, Malaysia, New Zealand, Peru, Singapore, Japan, the United States, Vietnam, Mexico and Canada.

Sustained economic and population growth is driving an increase in dairy demand for the Asia-Pacific, but to take full advantage of this unprecedented opportunity, TPP must be ambitious, comprehensive and commercially meaningful.

ADIC Chair, Noel Campbell said there is still a lot of work to be done and key dairy market access outcomes across the TPP remain unresolved.

“Major dairy players must recognise the importance of trade liberalisation and honouring previously agreed positions to advancing negotiations in a positive manner,” Mr Campbell said.

“A commercially meaningful outcome for the TPP would provide benefits to all countries involved, their industries and consumers. Yet in order to achieve positive results across the board all TPP nations must demonstrate a willingness to negotiate in good faith.”

Mr Campbell acknowledged the efforts of the Minister for Trade, the Hon. Andrew Robb, his staff and the team of dedicated negotiators who have worked on its behalf.

“We will continue to promote the interests of Australian dairy as negotiations progress, and hope to see a comprehensive agreement reached in the near future.”

The ADIC remains are committed to working Government to reach a transformative outcome that provides opportunity for its farmers and processors.

To find out more about the ADIC’s work to liberalise access to key dairy export markets see here


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