Making the most of Canberra

Mar 31, 2017

On Wednesday, Australian Dairy Farmers (ADF) were in Canberra to discuss a range of issues with Ministers and Members of Parliament.

Throughout the day, ADF had the opportunity to discuss what is working well within the industry and to discuss what else needs to be done.

Our advocacy and policy work is at the heart of everything we do and is essential to ensuring Australian dairy remains competitive and well aligned for growth.

These meetings give us the opportunity to pursue important industry policy priorities and to reaffirm relationships with Ministers.

The main issues discussed included:

  • The progress on the draft Code of Practice;
  • The impact of technical barriers to trade (TBT) on the Australian dairy industry’s international trading opportunities;
  • Access to overseas workers to fill our workforce labour gaps;
  • Pathways to permanent residency for New Zealand born dairy farmers; and
  • Reiterating our support for the Effects Test currently before Federal Parliament. 

ADF continues to advocate for policies which will support the industry and we will continue to seek Government support to help drive innovation, which increases productivity and profitability.

We’re committed to ensuring the voice of the dairy is heard by highlighting the issues to Government and working with them on important reforms.

John McQueen

Interim ADF Chief Executive Officer


 

 

Good news for farmers

Dec 02, 2016

ADF has long-advocated for change to tackle big business misusing its power and reducing competition in markets.

Yesterday, the last day of Parliament for 2016, Treasurer Scott Morrison announced the introduction of the s46 ‘effects test’ legislation 2016 into the Federal Parliament.

The introduction of an effects test is in line with competition policy around the world – Australia will be joining the clear majority of developed nations who already have established effects tests.

The provision, which will be included in section 46 of the Competition and Consumer Act 2010, will address the current unequal distribution of market power and encourage transparency to the benefit of producers, consumers and retailers.

The considerable amount of work, investment, planning and risk required to produce, transport, process, distribute and deliver a perishable product, fresh milk, on a daily basis is not reflected in the current discounted price of dairy by major retailers.

Supermarket discount tactics are directly affecting market supply and demand functions, effectively blocking processors from being able to provide necessary stronger prices to farmers to stimulate milk production.

We are looking forward to the ‘effects test’ legislation being passed early next year.

Another major development that occurred in Parliament yesterday was the resolution of the backpacker tax.

ADF have consistently said that we believe it is reasonable for backpackers to pay some tax, but 32.5 per cent was too high.

Led by National Farmers Federation (NFF), ADF and our state member organisations have lobbied for a decision over the past 18 months and we can honestly say it is a huge relief.

The impact of months of indecision have been felt across the dairy sector. What we really need now is to get the message out there that backpackers are welcome on our farms and they will receive a fair tax rate for their work.

We thank the NFF and our members for their hard work to get this across the line. We know that this has not been easy and the process was long, however, we adapted and united as an agricultural industry to secure a deal which benefits farmers, backpackers, tourism and regional communities.

It is important to note that although we are small team at ADF, we remain committed to driving strong policy to transform the way our industry operates for the better.

David Basham

ADF President

 

Keeping our dairy farmers competitive

Oct 21, 2016

Competition laws are about to change. Australian Dairy Farmers (ADF) has lobbied hard for these changes and worked with many different organisations to represent the needs of farmers.

Since January 2011, Coles and Woolworths have continued to cause unnecessary worry for farmers by devaluing products in the supply chain. Milk was the first weapon of choice in their discount war as it was a household staple and something that consumers were emotionally attached to.

However, milk is not the only dairy product that has been devalued in the price war. Other Australian staples such as cheese, yogurt and butter have also seen a significant price drop that further provokes an already besieged industry.

After almost six years of unsustainable pricing, consumption of dairy in Australia has dropped. Data collected by Dairy Australia clearly shows that cheap dairy has failed to deliver on the major supermarkets claim that lower prices will increase consumption. Their marketing strategy has resulted in millions of dollars being taken out of the value chain, which has impacted severely on many dairy farmers.

The battle for the hearts and dollars of Australian consumers has distressed the dairy industry, threatened small shopkeepers and prompted a Senate inquiry.

In mid-March, the federal Senate launched an investigation into dairy pricing and whether Australia's supermarket giants engaged in anti-competitive practices.

ADF was at the forefront on advocacy and policy demanding change in an industry that caused unnecessary financial pain and worry for farmers through the devaluing of dairy as a product.

The senate inquiry resulted in the Australian Government issuing a draft amendment to the Competition and Consumer Act 2010 outlining a number of changes ADF has been pushing for.

Most significantly, the draft Bill enables the introduction of an ‘Effects Test’ into Australian competition law. The effects test is a logical tool in the Australian Competition and Consumer Commission’s (ACCC) kit bag that most other developed countries in the world have.

ADF has long-advocated for change to tackle big business misusing its power and reducing competition in markets. There is no silver bullet to fix the imbalance of market power that dairy farmers experience, however ADF, together with our state members, are continuing to fight for farmers.

Even though this is an ongoing issue, we are still pushing for the major supermarkets to raise the price of dairy to a sustainable level. This will ensure a fair price for everyone along the supply chain.

David Basham

Acting ADF President

Global Milk Prices Are On The Rise

Sep 09, 2016

Recent data on global dairy prices shows a positive rise that looks as if it might continue.

The average price in the Global Dairy Trade auction overnight rose by 7.7 per cent. This followed two consecutive rises in the past month, with a 12.7 percent increase in prices at the most recent auction, while the important whole milk powder (WMP) price rose by 3.7 per cent.

These results have driven the index to an 18 month high.

Analysts are predicting further rises in the global milk price which suggests that the worst might be behind us and we may start to see some stability return to the global milk supply. This will hopefully occur through rebalancing of supply and demand due to cut backs in EU production, intervention buying of SMP (skim milk powder) in Europe and increased buying in China.

Although these increases are nowhere near enough to return to sustainable prices it is pleasing to see that prices are on the rise and things may be looking better in the long term.

Unfortunately, the most optimistic scenarios see the market turning in any meaningful way in the first quarter of 2017.

As dairy farmers we have a limited capacity to manage the market price so it is important to always focus on what we can manage, remain aware of industry risks and maintain a low cost production system so we are in a better position to weather any storms.

While we are an industry that has been under intense pressure, we are also an industry that has the know-how and resilience to overcome adversity and thrive in the long term.

ADF, together with our state members, is continuing to fight for farmers. Even though we won’t be able to solve all of the issues farmers are facing, we are working to relieve some of the pressures to create change to ensure that an unfair share of the risk in the value chain is not taken by the farmer and that recent events in the industry don’t happen again.

Collaboration is the key to get us where we need to be. Our industry relies on all the elements to operate effectively. Farmers need processors and vice versa – so the solutions require all of us to come together to ensure a positive future.

While we wait for the uptick in prices we must remember that we are a resilient industry with a long, sustainable future ahead and our profitability depends greatly on the continued support of the Australian public.

It is important to remind the community that dairy farmers – regardless of the challenges they face are good business people, who care for their cows, work to enhance the well-being of their people and that every efficiency we make on farm has ties to minimising our impact of the environment.

To view the global dairy price index [click here]

David Basham

Acting ADF President


 

 

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