Farm Life - Animal Health and Welfare

May 26, 2017

Farm animal welfare is a significant issue in Australia and overseas, and consumers are increasingly interested in knowing that a high standard of animal welfare is maintained throughout the supply chain of products they purchase.

Healthy and well cared for cows are a priority for every dairy farmer as it is central to having a successful and sustainable dairy farm.

There are many on-farm practices that have been part of dairy farming for hundreds of years and we must ensure we have a social license from consumers to continue the practices. We recognise that some things that happen on-farm can be confronting to people who are not farmers and may not understand the reason behind them. It is up to us to ensure the public understand what we do, why we do it and that at the core of every farmer is the health and wellbeing of their animals.

As an industry, we take our responsibilities for animal welfare seriously and are committed to continuous improvement of our animal husbandry practices. All farm animals must be treated with care.

We want our consumers to know farmers, processors, transporters and meat processors actively engage with each other to ensure all cows and calves are treated humanely.

The Australian dairy industry supports the Australian Animal Welfare Standards and Guidelines for Cattle as well as the Land Transport Standards and Guidelines. These were developed in partnership with the animal welfare groups and Government, and provide the industry with a clear vision that the welfare of all animals in Australia is promoted and protected by the adoption of sound animal welfare standards and practices.

We are continuously working to improve animal welfare standards to ensure we meet consumer and public expectations and expect all persons managing livestock abide by these standards to ensure best practice is observed on-farm.

It is a priority of the dairy industry to regularly review policies and practices in line with public perceptions and to invest in ongoing national training and education to ensure farmers constantly strive to go above and beyond the agreed standard.

ADF, in collaboration with Dairy Australia, and other industry partners continue to work with industry, Government and animal welfare groups such as the RSPCA to ensure the wellbeing of our herds in all farming systems.

John McQueen

Interim ADF Chief Executive Officer

 

Murray Goulburn’s pledge to rebuild

May 05, 2017

Murray Goulburn’s’ (MG) announcement on Tuesday was significant for the industry.

In their statement, MG said it would shut down its Rochester and Kiewa factories in Victoria and the Edith Creek factory in Tasmania; and ‘forgive’ the MSSP or milk cheque clawback from farmers.

We welcome MG’s announcement to scrap the MSSP which, will bring very important financial relief to affected farmers. We believe this will be a step forward in rebuilding trust and confidence between farmers and the processor.

Let’s hope Fonterra quickly follows suit as it did last year and reverses their cuts to farmers in 2016.

We also need to acknowledge that the factory closures will cause a significant amount of distress to the employees, dairy farmers who supply the factories and affected communities. This is never easy and these types of transitions are difficult for everyone affected.

MG has said the plant closures are necessary to keep the Co-op sustainable and will initially cost $99m but should get a net benefit from the closures of $15m from 2018 financial year. MG said about 360 jobs will be lost in the plant closures, which will cut costs by $40-60m over the next 18 months.

ADF recognises that these actions are designed to improve the strength of the company and ensure suppliers remain with the Co-op.

The announcement by MG has really highlighted how important a competitive and strong Co-op is for the dairy industry and we have genuine confidence that things will change for the better.

John McQueen

Interim ADF Chief Executive Officer

 

Making the most of Canberra

Mar 31, 2017

On Wednesday, Australian Dairy Farmers (ADF) were in Canberra to discuss a range of issues with Ministers and Members of Parliament.

Throughout the day, ADF had the opportunity to discuss what is working well within the industry and to discuss what else needs to be done.

Our advocacy and policy work is at the heart of everything we do and is essential to ensuring Australian dairy remains competitive and well aligned for growth.

These meetings give us the opportunity to pursue important industry policy priorities and to reaffirm relationships with Ministers.

The main issues discussed included:

  • The progress on the draft Code of Practice;
  • The impact of technical barriers to trade (TBT) on the Australian dairy industry’s international trading opportunities;
  • Access to overseas workers to fill our workforce labour gaps;
  • Pathways to permanent residency for New Zealand born dairy farmers; and
  • Reiterating our support for the Effects Test currently before Federal Parliament. 

ADF continues to advocate for policies which will support the industry and we will continue to seek Government support to help drive innovation, which increases productivity and profitability.

We’re committed to ensuring the voice of the dairy is heard by highlighting the issues to Government and working with them on important reforms.

John McQueen

Interim ADF Chief Executive Officer


 

 

Australia, we are in good hands

Mar 24, 2017

This week, ADF President, Terry Richardson, took part in his first Animal Health Australia (AHA) industry forum in Canberra.

The meeting was called to discuss a range of topics including the management of the Emergency Animal Disease Response Agreement (EADRA), a unique contractual arrangement between Australia’s governments and industry groups to collectively reduce the risk of disease incursions and manage a response if an outbreak occurs.

Based on his first impression, Mr Richardson said the familiarisation and training offered to industry in the event of an outbreak is second to none.

“It is reassuring that as a collective we can come together with a shared goal of enhancing on farm bio-security practices and regulations.

“The degree of expertise and good management of our animal health and welfare issues means we are able to respond to any situation and manage any diseases to minimise their impact on farmers.

“This high level of preparedness is vital to show just how fast we, as an entire commodities industry, are able to respond to any outbreak should an issue arise”, said Mr Richardson.

Mr Richardson also took part in training for the National Management Group who have overall management responsibility in the event of an exotic disease incursion in Australia.

“The spread of the white spot virus in the SE Queensland prawn industry really highlights the threat posed to all agriculture from failing to maintain Australia’s strict biosecurity defence capabilities.

“It is important that we have adequate resources at the national and state levels, or we risk great (and increasingly) severe consequences.

“A large outbreak such as Foot and Mouth Disease would have significant repercussions and cost our economy up to $16 billion”, Mr Richardson said.

ADF has strong group of staff and farmers who are well prepared to respond to the threat of disease to safeguard the dairy industry and Australia’s reputation as a producer of safe, clean food.

In addition, resourcing of biosecurity remains a high priority for ADF and all industry bodies including AHA Industry Forum are encouraged to continue to pressure all governments in recognising this as a priority in the national interest.

John McQueen

Interim ADF Chief Executive Officer

 

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