Changing of the guard

Dec 22, 2016

As you may have heard, David Basham stood aside as ADF President last week for a period of three months. His decision to run for the Seat of Finniss in the South Australian State Government came about quite suddenly, we wish him every success with his campaign.

Another announcement was the appointment of Terry Richardson to act in the role of ADF President. Terry Richardson jointly operates a dairy farm with his family in Deans Marsh, south west Victoria, where he has lived since 2004 and has a 550-milking herd.

Terry was appointed as an Australian Dairy Farmers Business Director in November 2015 and was the logical choice for acting President due to his background and experience.

Holding several positions in the dairy industry, both in New Zealand and Australia, he was a director of Kiwi Co-operative Dairies for seven years as well as a dairy consultant with Agriculture New Zealand. After moving to Australia, he joined his local UDV branch and was later appointed to the South West Regional Extension Committee. He was previously Chairman of Warrnambool Cheese and Butter Company and has been a director of the company for eight years, a role he still holds.

There has been some talk in media circles that Terrys position at the Warrnambool Cheese and Butter Company is a potential conflict of interest.

The ADF Board asked Terry to act as the ADF President during the period of leave David has taken from the ADF Board. Members of Boards of most organisations can occasionally have circumstances where there could be a possible conflict and the important thing is that the Board members recognise the possibility of conflict and manage it accordingly.

This year has presented unprecedented challenges for the entire dairy sector. ADF has remained focused on laying strong foundations that builds resilience rather than leaving farmers vulnerable and we will continue to advocate strongly on their behalf.

The events of 2016 have given ADF the opportunity to really cement our working relationships with state members - QDO, NSWFarmers, SADA, TFGA, UDV, WAFarmers, and industry partners such as Dairy Australia and Australian Dairy Products Federation.

Continuing to work together will give us the know-how and resilience to support dairy farmers to overcome adversity and thrive in the long term.

This season has been one of the kindest seasons we have had in many years. The extended season of grass growth has improved bottom lines and with world market prices continuing to strengthen over the second half of the year, things are looking much better for the future than they were mid-year.

May 2017 treat everyone in the dairy industry better than 2016 and we wish everyone a Merry Christmas and a safe, prosperous New Year.

Australian Dairy Farmers

 

Good news for farmers

Dec 02, 2016

ADF has long-advocated for change to tackle big business misusing its power and reducing competition in markets.

Yesterday, the last day of Parliament for 2016, Treasurer Scott Morrison announced the introduction of the s46 ‘effects test’ legislation 2016 into the Federal Parliament.

The introduction of an effects test is in line with competition policy around the world – Australia will be joining the clear majority of developed nations who already have established effects tests.

The provision, which will be included in section 46 of the Competition and Consumer Act 2010, will address the current unequal distribution of market power and encourage transparency to the benefit of producers, consumers and retailers.

The considerable amount of work, investment, planning and risk required to produce, transport, process, distribute and deliver a perishable product, fresh milk, on a daily basis is not reflected in the current discounted price of dairy by major retailers.

Supermarket discount tactics are directly affecting market supply and demand functions, effectively blocking processors from being able to provide necessary stronger prices to farmers to stimulate milk production.

We are looking forward to the ‘effects test’ legislation being passed early next year.

Another major development that occurred in Parliament yesterday was the resolution of the backpacker tax.

ADF have consistently said that we believe it is reasonable for backpackers to pay some tax, but 32.5 per cent was too high.

Led by National Farmers Federation (NFF), ADF and our state member organisations have lobbied for a decision over the past 18 months and we can honestly say it is a huge relief.

The impact of months of indecision have been felt across the dairy sector. What we really need now is to get the message out there that backpackers are welcome on our farms and they will receive a fair tax rate for their work.

We thank the NFF and our members for their hard work to get this across the line. We know that this has not been easy and the process was long, however, we adapted and united as an agricultural industry to secure a deal which benefits farmers, backpackers, tourism and regional communities.

It is important to note that although we are small team at ADF, we remain committed to driving strong policy to transform the way our industry operates for the better.

David Basham

ADF President

 

Setting the Foundations for Long Term Solutions

Oct 28, 2016

Earlier this week, ADF spoke at the Senate Economics References Committee inquiry into Australia’s dairy industry.

We discussed a number of key historical points and highlighted long term solutions we believe will relieve some of the pressures faced by our dairy farmers.

Through consultation with our state member organisations, we proposed a number of solutions:

- The development of the Code of Best Practice on milk supply contractual agreements to ensure transparency and fairness in milk price arrangements

- To ensure that the ACCC review identifies and investigates sharing risk along the supply chain, supply agreements and contracts, competition, bargaining and trading practices in the industry and the effect of world retail prices on profitability

- Incorporating an effects test to show the impact of anti-competitive behaviour

- The implementation of a world dairy commodity pricing index and educational program for farmers to better understand the impacts of the world market price and impact on the domestic market

We reiterated the fact that although the dairy industry has gone through a difficult time, we are a resilient industry with a long, sustainable future ahead and our profitability depends greatly on the continued support of the Australian public.

Which takes me to my last point. The proposed 50 cent milk levy.

Yesterday evening I took part in an extended interview with a major TV network. On several occasions I stated that ADF did not support a levy being applied to drinking milk (50 cents or otherwise).

The 20 cent quote came from a completely different part of the interview (which was not aired) yet edited in a way that was out of context with the questioning. I said, it would be good if Coles were to increase the price of $1 milk by at least 20 cents.

Media does not always represent the facts and important messages can get lost in the push for ratings and dramatic intrigue.

We have contacted Channel 7 News to clarify that the impact of its editing together two different part-answers to two different questions has effectively contributed to misleading Australian consumers.

It is unfortunate when these things happen. Incorrect information leads to confusion in a time when we need open and transparent messaging. Our priorities have always been to work to strengthen the dairy industry’s foundations so we can achieve long term stability.

To get through this difficult period the industry needs strong leaders with one voice.

ADF together with our state member organisations believe a united vision is the key to achieving positive outcomes going forward.

David Basham

Acting ADF President


 

 

It is a win win situation

Oct 07, 2016

Collaboration is the key to get us where we need to be. Our industry relies on all the elements to operate effectively. Farmers need processors and vice versa – so the solutions require all of us to come together to ensure a positive future. It is a win win situation.

It is one thing to constantly pick apart the industry to highlight the problems, it is another to actually work together to bring about real solutions to ensure this never happens again.

Last week the Australian Dairy Farmers held an important meeting with state dairy organisation presidents and processors to address a range of contractual issues which farmer organisations have been trying to address and rectify for 15 years.

During the meeting we discussed a range of topics including the difficult circumstances of farm gate price reductions, the introduction of new legislation on unfair contracts which comes into effect in November and the outcomes from the August Symposium held by Deputy Prime Minister, Barnaby Joyce.

This meeting provided an ideal opportunity for the dairy industry to unite and develop a voluntary industry wide code of practice on contractual arrangements with farmers.

The code will include:

  - greater transparency in contracts and supply agreements

  - ensuring a pricing formula or a price setting mechanism is clearly defined within a contract

  - ensuring pricing adjustments to farmers throughout a contract are clearly defined and that there will be no retrospectivity

  - while acknowledging step ups do occur and step downs have occurred in severe circumstances, a principle should be incorporated into contracts which clearly outlines that as much notice as possible is necessary if a step-down has to occur

  - ensuring farmers should receive all payments that accrue over the term of a contract or supply agreement – the final payments of a contract should not be contingent on the farmer being a supplier when, for example, the June payment is made in mid-July

  - ensure that where a processor has a contracted volume limit or a different price for volume above a particular level then exclusivity of supply to that processor must not occur

  - ensuring there is a clearly defined mechanism for giving notice of termination of a contract

  - ensuring there is a clearly defined mechanism of how contract terms and conditions can be modified and the farmer having the right to a negotiated variation, not simply a request from the processor.

Incorporating these principles into a code of conduct will give farmers, or their representative, the opportunity to have a contract or supply agreement which is truly negotiated and not simply an agreement which is a “take it or leave” it approach to farmer’s milk supply arrangements.

The ADF together with the state member organisations have worked hard since the crisis unfolded to ensure future milk supply agreements are balanced, fair and transparent. It has been a long process to get to this stage and a major breakthrough for the entire industry.

State dairy farmer organisations have been working to achieve these improvements for many years. By having a national organisation which is well resourced the States can achieve things together that would be impossible to achieve on their own.

We plan on finalising the draft code as soon as possible, ahead of the new legislation and before the Australian Competition and Consumer Commission inquiry into the dairy industry is finalised next year.

Now more than ever, the dairy industry needs to remain focused and united in its goals to achieve a shared vision of improving the profitability and sustainability of dairy farmers and the entire dairy industry in Australia.

David Basham

Acting ADF President

 

 



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