Genetic progress reports now available

Jul 22, 2015

Farmers and their advisors have been eagerly awaiting the release of the latest Genetic Progress Reports which now include trends for the Balanced Performance Index (BPI).

This handy tool enables dairy farmers to track the impact of breeding decisions and changes in their herd’s genetic merit over time.

Developed by the Australian Dairy Herd Improvement Scheme (ADHIS), the Genetic Progress Report also allows dairy farmers to compare their herd’s genetic merit with the average and top 10% of their breed in the country.

The report includes a summary of 10-year trends, including traits that have improved, remained stable and reduced in the herd. It also includes indicators of the herd’s genetic merit for profitability and its rank out of all Australian herd recorded herds for the breed.

Seven graphs track changes in the herd’s genetic changes since 2004 for profit, type, longevity, mastitis resistance, fertility, protein and fat. Further graphs for Health Weighted Index (HWI) and Type Weighted Index (TWI) are expected in August 2015.

Micelle Axford, ADHIS extension manager, said farmers were using the report to identify breeding areas that have performed well and those they wish to improve.

Once they have identified the traits they want to improve through breeding, The Good Bulls Guide can be used to identify suitable sires.

“The report is generated from herd test data, so it is available to any farmers who herd record. There’s no need to supply extra information. Just request a Genetic Progress Report from your herd test centre or view it on your tablet using Mistro Web,” Ms Axford said. 

 For more information contact Michelle Axford 0427 573 330 maxford@adhis.com.au.

 

 

An example BPI graph now available in the new Genetic Progress Reports. 

ADHIS Update: Breeding news at your fingertip

May 11, 2015

Two short videos are online to explain changes to Australian Breeding Values (ABVs) and indices. 

The bull choices farmers make for every joining have a long term impact on the profitability of their herd. Farmers now have access to a broader range of communication forms, including animations, e-news and social media components in addition to the traditional media and web services.

Australian Dairy Herd Improvement Scheme (ADHIS) Extension and Education Manager, Michelle Axford said that ADHIS is committed to providing new and exciting content delivered across the most popular platforms.

“The science behind ABVs is complex, but how we use them to make good decisions doesn’t have to be.

“Providing practical breeding information across a range of devices will help farmers when choosing bulls,” Mrs Axford said.

 

Sign up to Genemail, the ADHIS e-news

Follow us on Twitter @ADHIS_Dairy

For more information or to arrange a presentation to your organisation, please contact ADHIS Extension and Education Manager, Michelle Axford on 0427 573 330 or maxford@adhis.com.au

Dairy looses leading innovator

May 05, 2015

On 26 April, the Australian dairy industry sadly lost leading software innovator and visionary, Dr Mike Larcombe to a lengthy battle with motor neurone disease.

Dr Larcombe founded MISTRO software, which is responsible for processing 95 per cent of herd testing information in Australia and is recognised as one of the most flexible and cost-effective herd recording programs in the world today.

His work continued with the development of a genomic database system for the Australian Dairy Herd Improvement Scheme (ADHIS) for storing and analysing DNA profiles of animals for artificial breeding.

As a long-standing member of ADHIS’ Record Standards Committee, ADHIS General Manager, Daniel Abernerthy described Dr Larcombe as one of Australia’s leaders in data, data transfer and herd improvement systems.

“Mike was a truly gifted man, with the ability to transfer his skills across many areas.

“Aside from playing an integral role in the design and redevelopment of our genomic evaluations systems and computer models, Mike also was a major contributor to Dairy Australia’s InCalf and mastitis reporting tools,” Mr Abernerthy said.

Dairy Australia Program Manager – Genetics & Data Management - Farm Profit and Innovation, Matt Shaffer, said Dr Larcombe’s impact on the industry had been phenomenal.

“Mike showed an amazing commitment to farmer outcomes through his work developing MISTRO as a key farm management tool for farmers and herd test centres, as well as the UDDER program which is still being used by more than 60 consultants in Australia and New Zealand,” Mr Shaffer said.

In 2011 Dr Larcombe was awarded the prestigious National Herd Improvement Association of Australia Meritorious Service Award, recognising the significance of his achievements and his standing among peers.

Select Tags