Legendairy Capital search sparks national interest

Aug 19, 2015

Dairy Australia Program Manager Suzi O’Dell hoped the search for a national “Legendairy Capital” would get some attention, but she never imagined the amount of interest the initiative has generated.

“We’ve received 104 nominations from communities throughout the country’s eight dairying regions; media interest in the program has been massive and has reached a massive audience,” she said.

The Legendairy Capital program was launched in April this year as an initiative to put rural and remote communities on the map, get people thinking about how dairy has played a part in shaping their community and nominate a project that will benefit them as a group.

“It’s been great to see communities getting behind the concept and sending in some excellent nominations,” Suzi said.

“We don’t hear enough about the community spirit that is such an integral part of Australia’s dairy sector. Celebrating towns that have endured and thrived throughout the years sits at the heart of the program,” she added.

The program will see one successful town from each of Australia’s eight dairy farming regions receive a $2500 grant to invest in a community project. One of those eight towns will then go on to receive the coveted title of Australia’s Legendairy Capital 2015, as well as a further $7500 for their nominated community project.

Nominations will be assessed by independent members of various dairy farmer representative groups and industry bodies in each state, with the grants administered by the Foundation for Rural and Regional Renewal (FRRR), on behalf of Dairy Australia.

Australia’s Legendairy Capital 2015 will be announced in September and will become a bi-annual program sitting in the Farmer Communications and Engagement Program in Industry Promotion and Product Innovation.

For more information on the Legendairy Capital project go to www.legendairy.com.au


Comboyne, NSW is one of eight Legendairy Capital finalists for 2015. 

Legendairy event showcase #gendairy leaders

Jul 21, 2015

Dairy’s most important asset is its people, and the 2015 Developing Dairy Leaders Program (DDLP) Alumni Masterclass is a strong testament to this. Run by Dairy Australia in partnership with Australian Dairy Farmers, the 2015 DDLP Alumni Masterclass provided nine participants the opportunity to further hone their leadership abilities.

The Masterclass focused on understanding leadership as a set of behaviours rather than a fixed position and was facilitated by life coach, Margie Warrell who has previously facilitated programs for organisations such as NASA and the United Nations.

The Masterclass attended a dinner where they were able to meet with industry representatives, and were later given the chance to listen to former Queensland Premier Anna Bligh, who delivered an inspiring speech about leadership.

On the final day, Masterclass participants attended the Canberra Legendairy Breakfast with parliamentarians – the perfect networking opportunity for future leaders of dairy.

Alumni took up the challenge eagerly, engaging politicians such as the Minister for Environment, the Hon. Greg Hunt and Senator Bridget McKenzie in discussion about a range of issues - from mental health to minimising the industry’s environmental footprint - putting to use the skills acquired throughout the DDLP program.

DDLP Alumni, Victorian farmer and ADF Natural Resource PAG Member, Dianne Bowles described the experience “refreshing”.

“It was wonderful to have the opportunity to engage with policy makers such as the Federal Member for Bendigo, the Hon. Lisa Chester who are truly interested in key issues affecting the sustainable growth of Australian dairy,” Ms Bowles said.

“The whole DDLP experience has provided me with a renewed understanding of the way Government and therefore industry advocacy works. It has encouraged me more than ever to stand up and take charge – I’d encourage all in the dairy industry to do just that too.”

Addressing the Legendairy crowd ADF Director, Simone Jolliffe spoke about the importance of leadership beyond the traditional view of the buck stopping with the person at the top.

“We often think of leaders and leadership as if they are the same thing. But who the leaders are and how they lead are two different things,” Ms Jolliffe said. 

“It is vital for our industry to have leaders, who can set direction and help themselves and others do the right thing to move forward. Leadership is not about knowing all the answers. It is about creating the right environment to ask the challenging questions.”

“What follows is being able to listen. There’s no point in asking a question if you put the ear muffs on when others start to answer you.”

The Legendairy Breakfast also featured Dairy Australia Chair, Geoff Akers and Minister for Environment, the Hon. Greg Hunt as key speakers. Around 35 members of parliament and their staff attended making the most of the opportunity to meet alumni and industry leaders while enjoying a dairy infused breakfast.

ADF works in collaboration with Dairy Australia to drive the DDLP which is managed by the NCDE. The DDLP aims to develop the capability and capacity of people in the industry who are interested in becoming more actively involved in representative and leadership roles within dairy and their community. 

To find out more about ADF’s work in the People and Human Capacity Policy Area click here

 

ADF Director, Simone Jolliffe with Senator Bridget McKenzie and Federal Minister for Environment, Greg Hunt. 


Federal Member for Bendigo, Lisa Chester MP with DDLP Alumni, Dianne Bowles at the Legendairy Breakfast. 

AIS Gives Dairy the Thumbs Up

Jun 08, 2015

The Australian Institute of Sport (AIS) is recommending the nation’s top athletes incorporate dairy foods more strategically into their diets, following new research, supported by Dairy Australia, which was launched last month.

The study found that eating a dairy-based meal before cycling helped counteract the loss of calcium in sweat and reduce the bone breakdown that would otherwise occur.

In a separate piece of research, the AIS also examined the effect of high intakes of dairy on gut comfort and time trial performance in their cyclists, shattering the myth that eating dairy before exercise causes stomach upsets.

According to the research team: “We were delighted to find that even pushing the pre-ride meal to include the entire amount of the day’s dairy intake guidelines had no detrimental effects on gut comfort or performance in cycling. So we feel confident about our recommendations around the various benefits of dairy before exercise.”

For more info see http://www.legendairy.com.au/



World Milk Day - Celebrating our farmers

Jun 01, 2015

Monday 1 June, is World Milk Day.

The Food and Agriculture Organisation of the United Nations started the day of recognition in 2001, and we’re using the occasion to celebrate the Aussie farmers who work hard to produce this delicious, nutritious beverage.

For Australian dairy farmers, producing and delivering premium milk is a matter of pride. This is why Australian dairy has a reputation for consistently high quality and safe products worldwide.

They work hard 7 days a week, 365 days a year to create fresh, great tasting and wholesome fresh milk that Aussies consumed almost 2.5 billion litres of in 2014 alone.

Each daily on-farm activity involved in producing the milk, whether ensuring the cows are healthy or efficiently cleaning milking equipment, contributes to the quality assurance of dairy products. From the twice daily health herd checks during milking to stringent testing for milk headed for the processor, safety is ingrained in what we do.

Our industry is known for being a ‘dairy deli’ in that we place great importance on the quality rather than quantity of supply and this is what sets us apart. It’s our point of difference to focus on our high quality standards and it’s something our industry must maintain (even with our aspirations of growth) as we will never compete on quantity or price with our major competitors.

Dairy farmers work rain, hail or shine to produce our milk and want to be known for being prosperous, trusted and world renowned for the nutrition of our dairy products. Like any Australian, dairy farmers hope to see the effort put into our work reflected in our returns.

Australian Dairy Farmers (ADF), as part of the Australian Dairy Industry Council (ADIC), is committed to ensuring our dairying sector has a sustainable future. That’s why we’re working with our farmers, processors and industry partners, including Dairy Australia, to ensure that dairy continues to enhance livelihoods, improve wellbeing and minimise its environmental footprint well into the future.

This commitment is recognised and promoted through the Dairy Industry’s Sustainability Framework. The second Progress Report has just been released and shows that while we still have hurdles to overcome, progress is being made. This Framework highlights to the rest of the world that Australian dairy is acting on its social, economic and environmental responsibility.

To produce, refrigerate, transport, process, distribute and deliver fresh milk requires a considerable amount of daily planning, work, risk and investment on the part of dairy farmers and processors.

So why be a dairy farmer? Is all the milk worth it? Dairy farmers would say yes ten times over – because they’re passionate about it.

This World Milk Day, we ask that everyone remember that milk is made from hard yakka, pure passion and a commitment to sustainable practices. It is made by an Aussie dairy farmer. 

 

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