Dairy Food Safety on World Health Day

Apr 07, 2015

Tuesday 7 April is World Health Day and this year the World Health Organisation is highlighting the importance of food safety with the theme: “From farm to plate, make food safe’.

It’s a theme that rings true when it comes to dairy foods.

Fact is: Australians buy a lot of dairy. According to Dairy Australia, in 2013/2014 we each consumed around 105.7 litres of milk, 13.4 kilograms of cheese, 3.9 kilograms of butter and 7.4 kilograms of yogurt.

But, there can be a fair amount of wastage in consumer land due to how the product has been handled post-purchase.

So, in the spirit of ‘waste not, want not’ and to shine the light on dairy food safety here are a few practical hints that might come in handy:

  • When the mercury’s rising, store your dairy foods in a cooler bag to transport them from the supermarket to home.
  • Make the dairy cabinet your last stop on your shopping trip, adding dairy foods to your trolley just before you hit the check out.
  • Check use-by dates and consider whether you can consume the food before its expiry date.
  • Take a tip from the supermarkets and pack your fridge like a pro - put foods that need to be consumed sooner at the front so they are used first.
  • Store milk in its original packaging – don’t transfer to glass bottles or jugs as these allow light in that can cause milk to spoil.
  • Milk can be frozen and then thawed overnight in the fridge. The milk may appear slightly grainy when thawed, but a good shake will fix this.
  • Butter is best purchased when required, but properly sealed it can be kept frozen for up to 12 months.
  • Wrap gourmet cheeses in baking paper and place in a sealed container in the fridge to help them last longer.

Of course, despite the very best efforts we have all been faced with a favourite dairy food that is edging towards its use-by date. But don’t despair – check out these inspirational ideas for using up left over dairy foods from the popular Kidspot blog!

Source: LEGENDAIRY 

ADIC shines spotlight on Australia's Legendairy women

May 01, 2014

 

Australian women’s contribution to the dairy industry was a cause for celebration at this morning’s Australian Dairy Industry Council’s (ADIC) Legendairy Women’s Breakfast.

ADIC Chair, Noel Campbell, said Australian dairy would not be the $13 billion farm, manufacturing and export success story it is today, without the contribution of women over the course of its history.

“Today we shine a spotlight on the many talented, passionate and dedicated women working across the dairy industry,” Mr Campbell said.

“From the farm, to the factory, to the family dining table, today’s ADIC breakfast celebrates the major contribution that women have made, and continue to make, to our industry.”

Australian Dairy Farmers (ADF), CEO, Natalie Collard, said women continue to perform many varied and important tasks across all levels of the industry.

“This is reflected in the fact that 62% of all women working on dairy farms are owner-managers, 25% are employees and a further 13% contributing family members,” Ms Collard said.

“When we also consider the hugely significant role that women play in shaping household budgets and associated purchasing decisions – their significance to the industry from farm gate to supermarket shelf becomes all too clear.”

Scientist and inaugural recipient of the ADIC’s Outstanding Service Award (OSA) in 2010, Dr Anne Astin, described women’s involvement in the industry as an important chapter in the history of Australian agriculture.

“Whether it’s on-farm, in the factory or the complex world of agri-politics, women continue to play a leading, if sometimes unheralded role, within the industry,” Dr Astin said.

“We can and must do more, as an industry and as a community to recognise and celebrate women’s unique and enduring contribution to Australian dairy.”

Mr Campbell thanked the event’s keynote speaker, Carolyn Creswell, founder and Managing Director of Carman’s Fine Foods.

“Carolyn’s success with Carman’s is an inspiration to a generation of young men and women and demonstrates in particular, how it is possible to balance success in business with family life,” he said.

Mr Campbell said in dairying regions and rural and regional Australia more generally, there has been a shift in the workforce, with more women working (46% of the workforce) and more men working part-time.

“This trend reflects the changing face of the modern Australian workforce, and the dairy industry is no exception,” he said.

“Over time, we will likely see more women involved in the industry and it’s important that we continue to focus our efforts in promoting the industry as an attractive career choice into the future.”

Mr Campbell thanked women involved at every level of the industry for their dedication, passion and commitment to Australian dairy.

To view the ‘Celebrating Legendairy Women’ video launched at the breakfast, click here.













Select Tags